The Walking Dead 7.10: “New Best Friends” Review

I gave it a 9 out of 10.

Richonne

This couple is going to kill me.

I loved Michonne helping Rick defeat the Thunderdome/punk zombie and not standing around fretting. His kiss on her forehead was so sweet. And giving her that cat. An undeniable receipt that Rick has been intrigued by Michonne, in that way, since the prison after their mutual animosity disappeared (let it sink into your brain: at some point during their time at the prison, he walked by her cell, noticed that rainbow cat, and filed that away, guys). Proof that the writers were creating a crumb trail leading to that canon episode. Richonners were not imaging things.

Rick and Michonne’s relationship feels normal. There is no angst. It’s the perfect mix of romance and friendship. They have been acting as the “mom and dad” of the group since season 5, after everyone reconnected post-Terminus. Nothing about their relationship, or their personalties as individuals, has fundamentally changed post-canon and it’s gratifying to watch.

Father G and Rick

Father G was an shifty coward when we first met him and I am delighted with how he has come full circle, in a manner that is realistic. While I was not a fan of the opening scene in 7.9, it was overall a decent way to both introduce the Garbage People and showcase the bond between Father G and Rick (honorable mention is his relationship with Aaron, too). With Glenn and Abe gone, Rick needs some bosom guy friends.

Carol and Daryl

Loved the scenes between them. I’m still sick of Carol, but I have always loved the relationship that she has with Daryl. She is on the same journey as Morgan, trying to hard to hold onto her humanity and isolating herself is the only way she knows how to do it. With Morgan, it’s the stick. I just wish they would not have her act so bitchy to people about it (I mean, you have people bringing you cobbler and you’re scowling at them, Carol). It was also very kind of Daryl not to tell her about Glenn and Abe, even though he very much wants revenge on the Saviors. Clearly, he does not want this at the expense of his friend’s mental state. Now, I am not sure where he thinks he is going since the Saviors want his hide and most likely will force Rick to take it from him. But perhaps at this point, he knows this won’t happen and they would all just go down fighting if it came to anything like the nonsense that happened with the Lucilling.

Morgan’s Stick

Morgan’s face when that petty Savior took his stick. He looked like someone took his blankie. He’s close to losing it.

Garbage People

How long has it been since the zombie apocalypse started? Not long enough for them to be acting like they are a decades old cult. I thought their leader, Jadis, was interesting, though. Perhaps there is a story here that began before the turn happened. In any case, I don’t trust them (duh). Pretty sure Rick will get stabbed in the back, but it’s a smart, calculated risk with the information and resources they have at the moment.

Richard, What Are You Doing?

I liked his character until he decided it was okay to get an innocent person killed to provoke King E to fight. Incredibly, I don’t distrust him because I know his hatred for the Saviors is sealed and he is clearly loyal to King E, but he’s probably going to do something stupid and get someone killed.

Cheap Green Screen

This is why I gave it a 9. What was up with that god-awful green screen when Rick and the Garbage People were at the top of the pile of trash? Was that on purpose? To give it more of a corny 80s feel? I have a feeling it was and…NOPE, that was dumb. An “E” for effort.

Final Thoughts

There was a lot of character-centered interactions in this episode and this is what TWD does best. I want to see evidence that these people care about each other. Next week, we’ll be at the Sanctuary, seeing how Eugene is doing and watching Dwight continue to be a shell of a person. SNORE (except for Eugene). I don’t miss episodes, so I’m not going to try to act high and mighty, like I’m going to skip it. I won’t.

 

The Walking Dead 7.9: “Rock in the Road” Review

After a dismal first half, the midseason premiere of The Walking Dead was pretty near awesome for me. I gave it a 9 out of 10. Not a 10 because there were parts that felt a little uneven to me. The direction? The cinematography? Rosita’s attitude and Carol’s bitchiness? I’m not sure, still musing on that.

Just to clear the air, I am a huge Richonne fan. Anything that happens regarding Rick and Michonne will get full, unrestrained, and possibly embarrassing, attention. Embarrassing to others, not me, you understand. You’ve been warned.

Team Family Back At It

Our 7B starts out strong with Team Family together and making plans to take Negan down and I am here for it. They ask Gregory for help with Negan (he says no, hilariously; however his people say, “Yes, teach us to fight”), connect with King Ezekiel (who, much more respectfully, also says no), meet back up with Morgan (who updates them on Carol) and have the audacity to steal explosives from Negan and take out a zombie herd by clotheslining them with a metal wire attached to two cars. Like, what? That was a glorious action sequence.

It was gratifying to see everyone on point like this, given The First Half of a Season That Shall Not Be Named, where our heroes and sheroes were scattered and traumatized and we didn’t see some characters for weeks. I completely understand that we needed to get familiar with and introduced to new groups. But it was still an unpleasant viewing experience. Judging by what executive producers and show runner Scott Gimple have said in various interviews, this was on purpose. Fine, fine. Moving on.

Carol and Rosita

I am exhausted with Queen Carol. How many times are we going to watch people be concerned about her, and she, in turn, treats them like the dirt beneath her feet? Since Daryl was left at The Kingdom, I assume he’ll run into or try to find Carol, tell her about Glenn and Abraham’s deaths (and Spencer’s and Olivia’s), that’ll snap her out of her emo-ration, so we can move her story along here. In my Ming the Merciless voice, “I’M BORED.”

I thought Rosita put on her Big Girl Underwear and had a truce with Sasha, but obviously not. I suspect she is angry about her part…wait. It was her entire fault. Right. She is angry about her 100 percent involvement in the event leading to Olivia’s death. You know, her half-baked attempt to take Negan out. I get it. But why be pissy at Sasha? I guess this drama will lead to something, so I’ve got popcorn.

Richonne Highlights

The hand hold that I barely registered the first time I watched, but it’s there. Their teamwork taking down the zombie herd. Michonne comforting/encouraging Rick after their close call getting back into the car (in which I agree with Rosita, it was too close). Their collective eye-rolls when Morgan suggested “just capturing Negan or whatever”. Perfection.

Another group? And they have guns!

Looking forward to seeing who this new group is that was mean-mugging Team Family really, really hard and invading their personal space. Rick grinned. He has a plan.

Moving: “Oh? Upsizing?” Nope!

During the process of selling our house and buying a new one, I read a lot about downsizing. Apparently, it’s not just for retirees anymore. There is a real trend happening where young families are trading in large homes for smaller ones or choosing to buy smaller homes from the start, many times located in the heart of the city.

I was finally able to put a name to this thing we were doing! Admittedly, it felt a little foolish to sell our roomy (although aged) home and exchange it for something  smaller in square footage with a bare patch of earth on the side of the house. Quite a change from high ceilings, a family room, living room, formal dining room and a large yard complete with fruit trees and berry bushes.

When we took a look at the first house we bought, there was so much to love about it! I found myself daydreaming about gardening with my kids. But in the almost four years that we’d lived there, we outgrew the space.

Not physically, but psychologically and emotionally.

The Yard

Maintaining a yard is a pain. In money or time. Neither DH, nor myself, want to spend multiple weekends weeding or using extra money to pay for upkeep. And the gardening? It wasn’t happening. Not because I was juggling a new baby and toddler at the time, and I just hadn’t got to it. It wasn’t happening because it is not my thing. I like spending time with my kids, my partner, reading, going out to places, and especially writing. Writing. And really, what makes me think gardening with my sons would involve anything other than seeds and dirt being thrown everywhere? I strongly suspect it’s not their thing either.

And there’s living in the Pacific Northwest, where 8-9 months out of the year, it’s wet or damp out. Sure, hiking on one of Oregon’s many beautiful trails in a misty drizzle is cool. Sitting in my backyard in a misty drizzle is not. I’ll just go in the house and brew some coffee, thanks.

Wasted space

Do you know what we did with the “formal” dining room? Turned it into a playroom and used the smaller eat-in near the kitchen for meals. My DH intuited before I did that a dining table in there is not a very good use of space for us.

And the living room. No one hardly ever went in there. It’s furnished, but the most use it gets is when we change things around a bit to accommodate a sleeping space for my visiting mom. And upstairs, a fourth bedroom was not being used (again, except for when my brother was here visiting) because my youngest still co-sleeps with DH and I. My sons are also quite close. When my littlest guy finally exits the big bed, they will probably want to share a room.

In retrospect, I realize how way too open and impersonal our first house was. Now granted, a interior design genius could have done wonders. I’m okay decorating, but not that good. But I think our new home fits our lifestyle much better. It’s smaller, but it’s perfectly cozy for our tastes.

Homeschooling: ENTP/ENFP learning style

I’ve started researching learning styles. Our #1 son is doing great with school, but I think there is always room to improve the process.

Most children in the early elementary school years love being active and have a hard time sitting still. This isn’t necessarily along biological gender lines, but boys tend to be more prone to the wiggles. This is my experience with our #1 son. And I don’t think him being a boy has much to do with it, but rather, his personality type. People have different opinions on the reliability of Myers-Briggs Personality Type, but the research behind it is solid. And if understood correctly, it’s a tool; a guide for explaining behavior, not so much predicting it. Also, each letter of a type is on a continuum. That means two people who have the same type, will still be very different from one another.

From what we can tell, we think that our #1 son is either a ENTP or an ENFP.

From the Myers and Briggs Foundation, ENFP adults are described as:

Warmly enthusiastic and imaginative. See life as full of possibilities. Make connections between events and information very quickly, and confidently proceed based on the patterns they see. Want a lot of affirmation from others, and readily give appreciation and support. Spontaneous and flexible, often rely on their ability to improvise and their verbal fluency.

ENTP adults are described as:

Quick, ingenious, stimulating, alert, and outspoken. Resourceful in solving new and challenging problems. Adept at generating conceptual possibilities and then analyzing them strategically. Good at reading other people. Bored by routine, will seldom do the same thing the same way, apt to turn to one new interest after another.

 

But what is life like for these personality types as children? According to the latest research, some letters show up fairly quickly and are easy to spot (such as Extroversion and Introversion) by the time your child is toddler age. For the other letters, it can take years. The above types as children are referred to ENP’s. Kidzmet has an excellent description of the ENP child and it very much describes my #1 son well. Here is another place that describes the learning style of an ENP. That really hit home; I recognized some of the challenges we have during school. He needs an incredible amount of stimulation and gets bored easy, any little thing will distract him and our nickname for him is The Negotiator. Our #1 will not take a simple no for an answer, and your explanation has to make sense to him. And when our final answer is “no” on something, we’ve found that we have to very clear about it. As the page with learning styles states, “there can be no room for alternative interpretation.”

Since we homeschool, I think’s very important to create the best environment in which he (and his younger brother eventually) can learn and I can facilitate that learning well. I’m an ISFP and knowing what his type probably is explains so much. Especially the exhaustion! But part of living life well on this planet, is learning to get along with people that are different from you.

Adult privilege

Remember those memes that were going around (and still probably are) of all these rules dad had for dating his daughter? It rubbed me the wrong way because it clearly expressed archaic, unhealthy ways on how to respond when your daughter inevitably starts dating. I recently saw another one that showed a wonderful alternative, here.

Not only do both parents and partners have no say on what a woman does with her body, but this is the case for all young people, including men. There is definitely plenty of sexism in the idea that dad has some kind of co-CEO role in deciding who is good enough to date his daughter, but what is also missing is the larger role adult privilege has in this mindset as well.

People are so quick to tell other people to check their privilege regarding race, sex, or sexual orientation, but rarely will you see someone check their own adult privilege or encourage someone to do the same. I doubt most people even believe this exists. The idea that your dad has a say in who you date or marry is very demeaning to women. But it’s also equally demeaning to young people in general. No one should have to jump through your arbitrary, subjective hoops to be worthy to date your child. And there should be enough trust in your child that they can choose someone who will respect them on their own terms, not yours.

Ok, no easy feat, I know. But it’s certainly a great parenting goal to aspire to. My kids are not teens yet, so check on how stressed my DH and I will be in 10 years!

Writing: Finding your own story

Yesterday, I read this post from Brain Pickings titled, “Good Writing vs. Talented Writing.” It discusses what literary critic Samuel Delany has to say about the craft in his book, About Writing: Seven Essays, Five Letters and Four Interviews. It really resonated with me, this part in particular:

Good writing is clear. Talented writing is energetic. Good writing avoids errors. Talented writing makes things happen in the readers mind — vividly, forcefully — that good writing, which stops at clarity and logic, doesn’t.”

I have a story in my brain that I started writing many years ago. I had a lot of great starts, then I’d hit a creative wall. Looking back, I think that I had no idea what I wanted to say or what issues I wanted to explore. A story about an interracial couple. Okay, what about them? Even ten years ago, I intuitively knew it needed to be about much more than their family/friends/co-workers don’t like the relationship. Outrageous plot-twists and secret-keeping sounded good at first, but once it got onto paper, it didn’t feel right for this story.

Another issue I struggled with was character development. Every writer does, but the main reason for my struggles were this: as a Christian at the time, I thought I had to weave a gospel message into the story. As a result, my characters were flat and boring. They also lacked clear, realistic motivations. I was attempting to wrench in a religious message at the expense of creating relatable, complex characters. And the final message of salvation, even then, felt incomplete and empty. What did I really want to communicate to my reader? Did I want to lecture them and manipulate their feelings or just present an experience and let them create their own meaning? Did I want to tell my own story, or a story I think I should be telling? Ultimately, self-censorship will never produce a good story.

Now, after maturing a bit, having different life experiences and leaving religion behind, I feel like I’ve grown as a person and can write from a more authentic place. Authentic for me, to be clear. This will be different for everyone. And shrugging off the shackles of religion is by no means the only way to grow as a person. But religion can indeed be a hinderance to personal growth (particularly the fundamentalist kind).

Homeschool: Handwriting update

I think that our decision to start cursive was a good one. So far, #1 son likes it and doesn’t have any difficulty learning the strokes. We’re using Kumon My Book of Cursive Writing Letters.

He still does some printing in Explode The Code (ETC) workbook; interestingly, his printing has improved as well. Although I suspect, it is more that his desire to try to print the best he can has improved. Why? I don’t really know, but I can speculate.

Maybe he likes the pace we go at now better than before and is more relaxed? Back in September, he was very resistant to handwriting. ECT has a few pages in each lesson where you have to write quite a bit and this is where he had little patience. We have since slowed down the pace of completing the ETC pages. There are nine pages in total and I originally tried to encourage him to complete all of them in one day. He wasn’t having that. I slowly realized that, even though he did not problems with the material, requiring a 5 year old to sit still and complete all those pages was an inappropriate expectation (it’s first grade work and I think expecting a 6 year old to sit still for that is a probably a bit much too). So now, we do the first five on the same day the lesson is introduced. We complete the remaining four by the end of the week. I don’t think the few cursive lessons he’s had has anything to do with his improvement in printing because we haven’t been doing it that long.

Most likely, his improvement is probably just increased maturity. It doesn’t seem like it, but there is a big difference between 5 years and 5.5 years.

We’re only a few pages into the Kumon book, but I will do another update in a few weeks!

Homeschooling Kindergarten: Winter/Spring

We made a few changes to our curriculum.

1. Handwriting. After going back and forth between considering print vs. cursive (I wrote a post on it here), we decided to teach cursive first. #1 son doesn’t particularly enjoy printing; at least he doesn’t enjoy having to write such straight lines. I think cursive will be more fun for him to learn, since it’s almost like drawing in some ways.

2. Reading/Phonics. We’re still doing Explode the Code, but have decided to do the lessons at a slower pace to account for #1 son’s impatience with writing. ETC is very writing intensive, so we’ll see if spreading it out helps. He loves reading, however, so we’ve added Hooked on Phonics to reenforce that. We did the first lesson today and he liked it.

Now I’m Reading is still a hit. The HOP books are similar, but I think the stories in NIR are written much better. Doing both is fine. I don’t think there can be too many ways to help with reading, as long as the child isn’t struggling or dislikes something.

3. Social Studies. These aren’t lessons, per se, but just reading books together. We bought a book series by Stuart J. Murphy called I See I Learn. The stories are based on four areas children are developing in: emotional, social, health/safety and cognitive. So far, we’ve read Percy Gets Upset and Freda Stops a Bully. He likes the stories, so for homeschooling, we’re going to both read and talk about what happens in the book.

4. Math. Still on Singapore Math and he has done well. Still, this is the hardest subject for me mostly because I constantly worry I’m not teaching it well. I think a confidence in math is super important, especially if a person ever wants a career in the hard sciences or technology. Basically, I don’t want the I’m-not-good-at-math virus to damage any future interest in the fields above.

Also. I am not sure how useful memorizing math facts is. I read this article on the matter. It seems to me mastering the concepts (with a good deal of practice, of course) is a better foundation for doing well in the higher mathematics (algebra, etc.). So, eventually mastering the concept of 10’s helps you do math better in your head, vs. memorizing addition facts.

I don’t know. Will be chewing on this for a bit.

Lastly, #1 son is taking a drama class at Oregon Children’s Theater. I think it’s about 6 or 7 weeks. I think he’ll enjoy it!

Happy New Year!

As always with this time of year there is the positive anticipation towards new opportunities and new goals, mixed with quite a bit of oh-now-back-to-the-grindstone-ugh feeling. I think it’s all normal. Aim high, and you’ll get some things accomplished.

We’re starting our last leg of Kindergarten. This semester will be twice as a long with Spring Break wedged in between. My next post will be a review of fall semester (#1 son did well!) and the tweaks we made for winter/spring. We officially start school tomorrow, but are taking it very slow since it’s a two-day week and our break was long.

Regarding my regular blog posts, it will be the same as usual; a mix of whatever the heck is on my mind. Hair, religion, writing, atheism, race, mixed families, homeschooling, pet peeves/rants about movies and shows. Woot!

Happy New Year and hope everyone has a great week!

Movie Review: Man of Steel

My DH and I went to see Man of Steel for one of our very few date nights back in June while we had family in town to babysit. I thought the movie was awesome. And now I can address some issues people have with the ending and the general tone of the movie. I’m sure everyone that has wanted to see it has seen it by now, but still: there are SPOILERS in this post!

Great start for a reboot

Culturally, we’ve been living off of the Christopher Reeve incarnation of Superman for over 30 years. The first Superman was, in my opinion, the first serious attempt to tackle the superhero genre. The material was taken seriously. Superman II was even better. Yes, there was some camp, but not too much.

Then, Superman III and IV happened and…*tears, ugly crying*

Then, Superman Returns happened and…*cursing, throwing chairs, Hulk Out*

I think the mistake Bryan Singer made (in addition to ditching the X-Men franchise HE started, to horrid results, but I digress) was riding on the coattails of Reeve’s version of the character. Perhaps he was banking on the nostalgia so many people have for it. But it was a failure. If I want to watch Reeve as Superman, I can just watch the original, not something pretending to be the original.

So enter Man of Steel. I think it was a great start to a new franchise. In my opinion, complaints about it being darker are unjustified because they are based, in part, on too much comparison to Superman I & II. In Man of Steel, Clark’s internal conflict was illustrated well and, I might add, more realistically. In the first Superman movie from 1978, Clark comes out of this 12 year hibernation ready to roll and fight for “truth, justice and the American Way.” Cavill’s version of Clark made it a little more clear that the character had to make a choice on what path he was going to take for his life and that it was not a particularly easy process.

That ending

Major spoilers ahead, so if you’ve somehow wandered here, LEAVE. Like in Superman II, Zod dies in the end; only this time it is from Superman snapping his neck. Some people think that killing someone goes against Superman’s established morals or ethics or something. I disagree.

1. Superman kills Zod in Superman II, as well. In fact, an argument can be made that he did this in somewhat of a cowardly fashion. He tricked Zod (which is fine) into getting his powers taken away. Then he pushes him off a cliff inside the Fortress of Solitude. Um, okay? Zod and his crew were as weak as a human at that point, why not take him to jail to face this justice you fight for?

2. In Man of Steel, however, it was clear that Zod was going to continue to go on a rampage. But that’s not completely why I think Superman made the correct decision to kill him. Superman had gotten the upper hand with Zod while inside a building with bystanders. Zod decides he going burn up a group of adults and children with his newly controlled heat vision. Superman asked him repeatedly to stop. He did not. After all that happened up to that point, only a fool would have taken a chance on those people’s lives, to see if Zod would suddenly not be homicidal, just that one time.

I think he made a good call that in no way diminishes his ethics. In that situation, killing Zod was the right thing to do, not just to save those people’s lives, but to stop the madness that was sure to continue unabated. Also, he clearly did not want to do it. I imagine that he was conflicted on not only killing another person, but the last surviving person of his “race” besides himself (that he knew of).

That’s my take.